Who says cerebral palsy and dancing don’t mix!

Students at the Children’s Learning Center (CLC) are moving all day long. CLC is a school at the Cerebral Palsy Association of Nassau County. Students at CLC get to  practice important life skills throughout their school day using the MOVE Program and Rifton Equipment.

 Students can practice sitting, standing, walking and even dancing.  At CLC we service children with a variety of physical challenges. The staff and the students have an appreciation for Rifton Equipment and the MOVE Program. There’s a distinct excitement in seeing how the right piece of equipment and the right program can change a child’s life. A piece of equipment can help someone become a runner, walk down the aisle to receive their diploma, dance at the Prom, or, in the case of one of our students, be an independent ballerina.  

Jessica is a happy, sweet, and caring young lady. She spends most of her day in a wheelchair. However, once she was put into a Rifton Pacer gait trainer, her smile was bigger than we had ever seen, as her world opened up and her legs led the way. Jessica practices her walking and standing every day at school with her teacher, educational assistants and therapists. As part of the MOVE program, Jessica starts her day coming off the bus and walks to her classroom using a Rifton Pacer. Having Jessica be upright in a Pacer was a way for her to be more independent and offered her an opportunity to interact with her peers at eye level in standing. Now Jessica can walk to the library, participate in classroom jobs and even run alongside of her peers to compete on a race track. 

Jessica running in the Rifton Pacer during the Nassau County Victory Games

Jessica running in the Rifton Pacer during the Nassau County Victory Games

But that wasn’t all! Many little girls grow up wanting to become a ballerina, yet as a child with cerebral palsy, this dream is more challenging. The Pacer made it possible for Jessica to be upright as a ballerina and perform on stage. It assisted in highlighting all of Jessica’s talent as she is now able to twirl on stage and give a ballet performance that none of us will forget! Nothing is more heartwarming than her smile as she performs while the audience cheers her on.

Jessica practicing her ballet moves for the CLC ballet recital.

Jessica practicing her ballet moves for the CLC ballet recital.

Thanks to the MOVE Program at CLC, Jessica has had many opportunities to practice walking and dancing in a Pacer. This past December, Jessica and her father were invited to attend the annual Sugar Plum Ball.  This ball is a special dance for fathers and their daughters.  If not for the Pacer, Jessica would not have been able to stand upright to dance independently with her father.  When given the Rifton Pacer, Jessica will even dance all day long with her friends and peers when she attends the annual CLC Prom. Jessica never wants to come out, she just wants to keep dancing. Jessica loves to “MOVE”.  Each time Jessica is in the Pacer there is a smile on her face.  

Jessica dancing in a Rifton Pacer at a Father/Daughter Dance

Jessica dancing in a Rifton Pacer at a Father/Daughter Dance

Jessica loves to “MOVE”.  Each time Jessica is in the Pacer there is a smile on her face.  Jessica’s family and support team at school have expressed that the MOVE Program and the use of the Rifton Pacer have increased Jessica’s independence not only in school but in her community as well.

 Submitted by, Jeoan Pierre, Special Education Teacher and Marcie Casimir, PTA & MOVE Coordinator at the Children’s Learning Center

Madison loves her new job at school.

You met Madison, a student at Decatur City Schools, in the Fall of 2018 when she achieved sitting on a typical student chair at her desk. Since that time, Madison has assumed some “jobs” at school. One of these jobs is to take the lunch count down to the office. Madison enjoys doing this so much that when it is not her turn - she puts up a fuss and asks if she can just “go along”. New worlds are opening for Madison.

You met Madison, a student at Decatur City Schools, in the Fall of 2018 when she achieved sitting on a typical student chair at her desk. Since that time, Madison has assumed some “jobs” at school. One of these jobs is to take the lunch count down to the office. Madison enjoys doing this so much that when it is not her turn - she puts up a fuss and asks if she can just “go along”. New worlds are opening for Madison.

 

Growing up with the
MOVE Program

This is Izyah. He has been using the MOVE Program for many years. At the age of ten, one of his favorite things to do was help wash the car. Involving children in everyday tasks is so important for their sense of purpose and enjoyment. At the age of sixteen, he enjoys playing “football”, which is actually the Rugby League in Australia. Using the Rifton Pacer gives him the independence in mobility that he needs to participate in this activity. Using the MOVE philosophy, Izyah has grown up experiencing age appropriate activities, with modifications just like his peers. Can’t wait to see what he is doing at 21!!

Submitted by: Tracey Banks, MIT
Queensland, Australia

KCSOS - Blair School, Bakersfield, CA

The students at Blair School, a MOVE Model Site, participated in the Annual Coach’s Choice Track Meet held at McKinley Elementary on April 5, 2019. This track meet is held for all students in the KCSOS system. Congrats to our MOVE students for participating along with their typical peers.

Combined move international trainer and recertification hosted by Chesapeake care resources in north east, maryland

Part of every MOVE International Trainer course is some hands on activities. The first picture is of participants learning how to adjust a retainer prompt using a typical classroom chair. An important part of the training is to have participants practice doing the transition that is used for upright brief changes with no equipment. At this training, we added eight new MOVE International Trainers. They joined 24 MOVE International Trainers who were recertifying their status.

MOVE International Trainer Class of 2019 from Bakersfield, CA.

In April, 2019, 13 MOVE Basic Providers achieved the status of MOVE International Trainers. This was a MIT training in Bakersfield, CA. Congrats to all.

In April, 2019, 13 MOVE Basic Providers achieved the status of MOVE International Trainers. This was a MIT training in Bakersfield, CA. Congrats to all.

New Adventure for students in Peoria Public Schools, IL

Peoria Public Schools show off mobility skills their students have achieved through the M.O.V.E program.  4 classrooms from Rolling Acres Middle School in Peoria, IL (3 severe/profound classrooms and 1 autism classroom) treated their students to a field trip at the roller skating rink!  This very successful day wouldn’t have been possible without the entire team which consisted of teachers, teacher’s aides, physical therapists, occupational therapists and speech therapists.  This Peoria Public School MOVE team is already planning for more challenging yet fun field trips.

Submitted by: Jaime Vaughn

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LUCAS REGAINS HIS ABILITY TO WALK

Lucas currently goes to Rio Linda High School, which is part of the Sacramento County Office of Education. When he was in early elementary school Lucas walked with his hands held. Over the years he became too heavy to safely assist, and then lost the ability to walk. His elementary school didn’t have a MOVE program, so Lucas was pretty much in his wheelchair most of the day. That changed when he entered middle school. Lucas started to regain his walking skills through the MOVE Curriculum run by his new school. With the use of the TRAM, he slowly started walking short distances again. However, he still could not get up from a chair, and standing required the full lifting assistance of the TRAM.

Lucas currently goes to Rio Linda High School, which is part of the Sacramento County Office of Education. When he was in early elementary school Lucas walked with his hands held. Over the years he became too heavy to safely assist, and then lost the ability to walk. His elementary school didn’t have a MOVE program, so Lucas was pretty much in his wheelchair most of the day. That changed when he entered middle school. Lucas started to regain his walking skills through the MOVE Curriculum run by his new school. With the use of the TRAM, he slowly started walking short distances again. However, he still could not get up from a chair, and standing required the full lifting assistance of the TRAM.

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This year, Lucas entered high school and is now using an E-Pacer to walk. And he continues to regain skills everyone thought were gone forever. Through all the practice opportunities offered to him over the past two years, Lucas is now able to stand up from his classroom chair while holding onto a staff member’s hands. He is walking over a thousand yards in the E-Pacer with classmates to the bus pick up point. He enjoys his new level of independence in moving about the campus! Staff is looking to transition Lucas into a regular Pacer soon. Congrats Lucas!

This year, Lucas entered high school and is now using an E-Pacer to walk. And he continues to regain skills everyone thought were gone forever. Through all the practice opportunities offered to him over the past two years, Lucas is now able to stand up from his classroom chair while holding onto a staff member’s hands. He is walking over a thousand yards in the E-Pacer with classmates to the bus pick up point. He enjoys his new level of independence in moving about the campus! Staff is looking to transition Lucas into a regular Pacer soon. Congrats Lucas!

Typical Community Outings at Chesapeake Care Resources
in North East, MD

Being out at the lake is another popular community outing. Heather is walking on the pier in her Pacer. Going over uneven planks of wood is a challenge but Heather is determined to reach the end of the pier.  Who would not enjoy looking out over the lake? Although the ladies may need assistance to walk to the bench they are able to sit independently on a typical park bench and “hang out” while enjoying a gentle breeze on a beautiful day.

Being out at the lake is another popular community outing. Heather is walking on the pier in her Pacer. Going over uneven planks of wood is a challenge but Heather is determined to reach the end of the pier.

Who would not enjoy looking out over the lake? Although the ladies may need assistance to walk to the bench they are able to sit independently on a typical park bench and “hang out” while enjoying a gentle breeze on a beautiful day.

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At Chesapeake Care Resources the individuals are out in the community all the time. Some of their favorite activities are going shopping for themselves. Joseph is purchasing an item at the store. Joseph uses the TRAM to allow him independent mobility. He has practiced the skill of using money at the day program before going out into the community.

At Chesapeake Care Resources the individuals are out in the community all the time. Some of their favorite activities are going shopping for themselves. Joseph is purchasing an item at the store. Joseph uses the TRAM to allow him independent mobility. He has practiced the skill of using money at the day program before going out into the community.

High Point School, part of Washtenaw ISD in Ann Arbor, MI became the 31st MOVE Model Site in Nov., 2018

High Point School became the 31st site to be dedicated as a MOVE Model Site on Nov. 14, 2018. It is not easy to become a MOVE Model Site as the expectations are quite high. As MOVE Intl. has “high expectations” for sites to become a MOVE Model Site, High Point has “high expectations” for their students. When you enter the school you will see students practicing their gross motor skills of sitting, standing, walking and transitioning throughout the day and in all school environments. Motor skills are taught throughout the routine day and the student’s days are filled with fun learning activities. Upright toileting has been very successful and several students now void on the toilet. Emma and her mom participated in the dedication ceremony and enjoyed the dance afterwards with all the glitter and glamour of a typical school dance. A local DJ donated his time and provided some great dance music. Students were rocking it in their Pacers, walkers, etc. along with parents and staff.

High Point School became the 31st site to be dedicated as a MOVE Model Site on Nov. 14, 2018. It is not easy to become a MOVE Model Site as the expectations are quite high. As MOVE Intl. has “high expectations” for sites to become a MOVE Model Site, High Point has “high expectations” for their students. When you enter the school you will see students practicing their gross motor skills of sitting, standing, walking and transitioning throughout the day and in all school environments. Motor skills are taught throughout the routine day and the student’s days are filled with fun learning activities. Upright toileting has been very successful and several students now void on the toilet. Emma and her mom participated in the dedication ceremony and enjoyed the dance afterwards with all the glitter and glamour of a typical school dance. A local DJ donated his time and provided some great dance music. Students were rocking it in their Pacers, walkers, etc. along with parents and staff.

 

Oak Park Elementary School
Decatur, AL

Madison’s success

Our students, including Madison, have now transitioned from their wheelchairs to gait trainers and typical student desks/chairs during meals and circle time. Madison used to slump in her gait trainer and/or wheelchair. She needed constant verbal prompts to “sit up” like a big girl. The MOVE Team decided to use a typical student desk/chair and step stool (for foot support) during circle time activities. Much to our surprise, Madison asked to stay in the desk ALL DAY LONG!  Her posture has improved significantly. She sits up straight, like her typical peers, requiring very few verbal prompts. Madison now sits in a regular desk/chair for all her activities, including lunch. Her wheelchair is used only for transport. Madison is just one example of how MOVE is impacting our students.  Submitted by: Nicole Long Special Education Teacher

Our students, including Madison, have now transitioned from their wheelchairs to gait trainers and typical student desks/chairs during meals and circle time. Madison used to slump in her gait trainer and/or wheelchair. She needed constant verbal prompts to “sit up” like a big girl. The MOVE Team decided to use a typical student desk/chair and step stool (for foot support) during circle time activities. Much to our surprise, Madison asked to stay in the desk ALL DAY LONG!

Her posture has improved significantly. She sits up straight, like her typical peers, requiring very few verbal prompts. Madison now sits in a regular desk/chair for all her activities, including lunch. Her wheelchair is used only for transport. Madison is just one example of how MOVE is impacting our students.

Submitted by: Nicole Long
Special Education Teacher

 

MOVE Training in Charlotte, NC

On Dec. 9, 2018 Charlotte, NC was under a winter storm warning. On Dec. 10-11, 2018 all twenty participants braved the weather to attend a MOVE Basic Provider training. These individuals showed true dedication to the students they service by making it to the training. Great group of professionals.

On Dec. 9, 2018 Charlotte, NC was under a winter storm warning. On Dec. 10-11, 2018 all twenty participants braved the weather to attend a MOVE Basic Provider training. These individuals showed true dedication to the students they service by making it to the training. Great group of professionals.

 

Watch this exciting video of the MOVE Program at the Meadowood Program, Red Clay Consolidated School District

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LYFYbioHeM&t=2s

 

Johnny’s Success with Toileting

Johnny began preschool at Cloverpatch Preschool at Prospect Center September of 2017. At just three and a half years old this was a huge step for both Johnny and his parents. With his Aunt Dianne as his 1:1 aid, Johnny acclimated quickly to his full day integrated program. Through the MOVE program, Johnny was encouraged to access his environment out of his wheelchair throughout his school day. Without missing a beat, his aunt established a routine using equipment (Rifton Pacer gait trainer, Rifton Dynamic Stander, Rifton Activity Chair) and outside support to allow Johnny to functionally participate in his school day.  After arriving to school in his wheelchair, while still in the hallway, he was transitioned into his gait trainer. He was encouraged to walk into the classroom and sign in and interact with peers as they arrived to school. After being in his gait trainer for approximately 20 minutes, Johnny would require toileting. Following toileting, Johnny was positioned in his activity chair for dining. And so his mornings went for a couple of months.  Recognizing that Johnny was very regular with his toileting needs, his team decided to trial him on the Rifton Hygiene and Toileting System (HTS). Johnny had shown great progress in his ability to tolerate an upright, supported sitting position in the Rifton Activity Chair, leading the team to believe that positioning in the HTS would be similar. Johnny was fitted and trialed in the HTS fully clothed and was found to tolerate positioning as suspected. Additionally, Johnny’s ability to utilize an eye gaze device to communicate would allow him to indicate his need to utilize the bathroom.  The plan was to tweak his routine a little to hopefully catch him before he relieved himself, position him on the HTS and encourage urination and bowel movements while positioned. With a plan in place, just a few weeks after his fourth birthday, Johnny began his toilet training journey. The first day the plan was implemented in February of 2018, Johnny’s day started like any other, however, following-sign in he was positioned on the HTS...and then his world changed. Johnny was successful in both urination and BM on the HTS!! From day one Johnny never looked back. With consistent, scheduled toileting, he was continent of both bowel and bladder throughout his school day! At Prospect this is built into the daily classroom routine and Johnny was able to become toilet trained.  The use of the Activity Chair in the months prior to his toilet training was key in building his tolerance to upright positioning. Recognizing the pattern in his bowel and bladder habits, as well as his ability to communicate, were also important clues that toilet training may be successful for Johnny. However, most importantly was that he was given the opportunity to rise to the challenge and show what he was capable of. Johnny continues to utilize the HTS at school and due to his success, he was able to receive an HTS for use at home.  Linda Miller  CFD - Prospect School

Johnny began preschool at Cloverpatch Preschool at Prospect Center September of 2017. At just three and a half years old this was a huge step for both Johnny and his parents. With his Aunt Dianne as his 1:1 aid, Johnny acclimated quickly to his full day integrated program. Through the MOVE program, Johnny was encouraged to access his environment out of his wheelchair throughout his school day. Without missing a beat, his aunt established a routine using equipment (Rifton Pacer gait trainer, Rifton Dynamic Stander, Rifton Activity Chair) and outside support to allow Johnny to functionally participate in his school day.

After arriving to school in his wheelchair, while still in the hallway, he was transitioned into his gait trainer. He was encouraged to walk into the classroom and sign in and interact with peers as they arrived to school. After being in his gait trainer for approximately 20 minutes, Johnny would require toileting. Following toileting, Johnny was positioned in his activity chair for dining. And so his mornings went for a couple of months.

Recognizing that Johnny was very regular with his toileting needs, his team decided to trial him on the Rifton Hygiene and Toileting System (HTS). Johnny had shown great progress in his ability to tolerate an upright, supported sitting position in the Rifton Activity Chair, leading the team to believe that positioning in the HTS would be similar. Johnny was fitted and trialed in the HTS fully clothed and was found to tolerate positioning as suspected. Additionally, Johnny’s ability to utilize an eye gaze device to communicate would allow him to indicate his need to utilize the bathroom.

The plan was to tweak his routine a little to hopefully catch him before he relieved himself, position him on the HTS and encourage urination and bowel movements while positioned. With a plan in place, just a few weeks after his fourth birthday, Johnny began his toilet training journey. The first day the plan was implemented in February of 2018, Johnny’s day started like any other, however, following-sign in he was positioned on the HTS...and then his world changed. Johnny was successful in both urination and BM on the HTS!! From day one Johnny never looked back. With consistent, scheduled toileting, he was continent of both bowel and bladder throughout his school day! At Prospect this is built into the daily classroom routine and Johnny was able to become toilet trained.

The use of the Activity Chair in the months prior to his toilet training was key in building his tolerance to upright positioning. Recognizing the pattern in his bowel and bladder habits, as well as his ability to communicate, were also important clues that toilet training may be successful for Johnny. However, most importantly was that he was given the opportunity to rise to the challenge and show what he was capable of. Johnny continues to utilize the HTS at school and due to his success, he was able to receive an HTS for use at home.

Linda Miller

CFD - Prospect School

 

Meet Olivia

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Olivia started at the RISE Learning Center in 2016-2017 school year.  She came to school after having hip dysplasia and corrective surgery.  Olivia wasn’t able to fully extend her legs and preferred the fetal position for comfort.  Olivia often expressed her discomfort in other positions by crying.  Olivia started using the Rifton Support Station and Rifton Pacer to allow her legs the opportunity to extend.  Olivia has been tolerating her adapted mobility equipment without crying and smiles when given the opportunity to be at eye level with her peers. 

Olivia likes music and hanging with her peers.  As the extension of her hips and knees has increased, Olivia is now able to tolerate standing in a Rifton Dynamic Stander for up to an hour!  Olivia is starting to push through her legs to come to standing position during transitions as well!  Olivia now participates in our school’s spirit club and encourages our basketball team during their games. 

Olivia now utilizes her adapted mobility equipment both at school and at home.  Olivia and her parents have a renewed hope thanks to the help of the M.O.V.E. program!

Submitted by: Allison Compton

 

RISE School wants you to meet Rebeca

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Rebeca is a young lady who has been involved in the M.O.V.E. program for a few years.  Over the past 2 years, Rebeca has blossomed in her interactions with her environment and others.  When Rebeca first came to school, she crawled as her main form of transportation throughout her environment.  She is now sitting independently in a classroom chair and walking throughout her school environment with support at her forearms in her Pacer or with one hand held. 

Since Rebeca has been up and moving, she is starting to engage with things around her.  She is starting to taste new foods, communicate with her peers, and tolerating daily living activities.  Rebeca did not want to engage with others when starting school and now she is seeking out interactions with not only staff but her peers.  Rebeca did not like to be touched when starting school and now she smiles and laughs and is starting to seek out touch from others.   Rebeca is also enjoying her time in the therapy pool.  This used to be one of her least favorite activities but now her smiles say otherwise. 

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Rebeca has learned to “move” where she wants to go in her environment instead of waiting for an adult when in her Pacer.  Rebeca is making choices of things she wants and making eye contact with objects and people in which she is engaging.  Rebeca hasn’t had the opportunity to experience much of her community since crawling was her only way to get around.  Now with walking with one hand held or using her Pacer, Rebeca is enjoying community trips and riding the bus in a regular bus seat.  With the opportunity to “move”, Rebeca’s personality now shines bright.

Submitted by Emily Hankins

Submitted by Emily Hankins

 

The E-Pacer  at CERTS

In August 2017, C.E.R.T.S. Adult Day Program hosted Rifton at our Model Site in Newark, Delaware for the demonstration of their New E-Pacer.

Since that time, Home MediService Inc. was very generous in lending us an E-Pacer for several weeks to use. We had the opportunity to trial several of our participants at both our Newark and Smyrna sites.

We used the E-Pacer with Cory at our Smyrna site, the integrated lift and XL size was ideal to give Cory an opportunity to get up into a Pacer/gait trainer. Cory’s size would have made a manual gait trainer much more difficult. His Mother stated when she saw him up in the pacer that he “looked awesome in it!”

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Demi from the C.E.R.T.S. Newark site trialed the E-Pacer, she appears standing more upright and in a better position for taking steps. Our staff commented on the ease and safety of getting Demi in and out of the E-Pacer.

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M.o.v.e. is for everyone - including adults

Although the MOVE Program was started for children, it has proved highly successful with any age individual with multiple disabilities. MOVE for Adults started with a pilot study at Chesapeake Care Inc. in Maryland back in 2004. MOVE is all one program from toddlers to geriatrics. There are adult day programs across the US that have incorporated the MOVE Program.

 
 

 

Whale Watching Adventure

August 28, 2017

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Deanna Bandy is a very social and fun loving lady. She is a talented artist and enjoys drawing. This picture is from a whale watching trip. There was a pod of whales swimming along side the boat. Deanna loves animals and also likes listening to music. Quite often you will find her singing along to the radio.

When Deanna began attending Smith Center Adult Day Program she joined the MOVE program. In the beginning, she was a bit scared and resistant about using the Rifton Equipment. The staff, along with the physical therapist, worked with Deanna daily to form a trusting relationship.   Deanna remained a bit apprehensive but eventually she was willing to try to use the equipment, once she understood all the benefits that came along with being involved in the MOVE Program. In preparation for this staff started with just asking Deanna to help in her personal care needs.

The physical therapist started working with Deanna on sitting upright on the edge of a mat table. Staff began to incorporate this into her daily routine. As Deanna's ability to sit upright increased staff provided less and less support. Deanna is now able to sit upright unsupported for short periods of time and she is also able to sit in a Rifton Activity Chair with minimal prompts. Deanna has created many of her beautiful drawings while sitting in the Rifton Activity Chair with the tray attached. She also enjoys working on activities and having her lunch while sitting in the Activity Chair.

Deanna's picture of her whale watching adventure.

Deanna's picture of her whale watching adventure.

Soon Deanna was using the Rifton TRAM to help elongate and stretch her body and hips. This was performed by assisting Deanna into the Rifton Tram with the saddle prompt as a sling, under the guidance of the physical therapist initially. Deanna's face lit up as soon as she was raised to an upright position. She was so happy to be at eye level with the staff and some of her peers. This was a brand new experience for Deanna. Soon she was able to spend longer periods of time in the TRAM as her body adjusted to it. She loves strolling throughout the building and visiting with her peers and staff while she's in the TRAM.

Spending time in the TRAM has become something that Deanna truly looks forwards to every day. Deanna has greatly benefited on many levels from being involved in our MOVE program.

Submitted by: Tammi Czarnecki
Center for Disabilities - The Smith Center

 

Individuals at C.E.R.T.S. in Delaware are able to trial the new Rifton E-Pacer.

In August 2017, C.E.R.T.S. Adult Day Program hosted Rifton at our Model Site in Newark, Delaware for the demonstration of their New E-Pacer.  Since that time, Home MediService Inc. was very generous in lending us an E-Pacer for several weeks to use. We had the opportunity to trial several of our participants at both our Newark and Smyrna sites.  We used the E-Pacer with Cory at our Smyrna site, the integrated lift and XL size was ideal to give Cory an opportunity to get up into a Pacer/gait trainer. Cory’s size would have made a manual gait trainer much more difficult. His Mother stated when she saw him up in the pacer that he “looked awesome in it!”  Christina from the C.E.R.T.S. Newark site trialed the E-Pacer, she appears standing more upright and in a better position for taking steps. Our staff commented on the ease and safety of getting Demi in and out of the E-Pacer.

In August 2017, C.E.R.T.S. Adult Day Program hosted Rifton at our Model Site in Newark, Delaware for the demonstration of their New E-Pacer.

Since that time, Home MediService Inc. was very generous in lending us an E-Pacer for several weeks to use. We had the opportunity to trial several of our participants at both our Newark and Smyrna sites.

We used the E-Pacer with Cory at our Smyrna site, the integrated lift and XL size was ideal to give Cory an opportunity to get up into a Pacer/gait trainer. Cory’s size would have made a manual gait trainer much more difficult. His Mother stated when she saw him up in the pacer that he “looked awesome in it!”

Christina from the C.E.R.T.S. Newark site trialed the E-Pacer, she appears standing more upright and in a better position for taking steps. Our staff commented on the ease and safety of getting Demi in and out of the E-Pacer.

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