LINDA B WITH GIRL:

  MOVE began in
  Bakersfield, California in
  1985.Kern County
  Superintendent of
  Schools special
  education teacher
  Linda Bidabe, with a
  team of special
  education staff and
  a physical therapist,
  began a study to
  assess the condition
  of students with
  severe disabilities.
  Today MOVE has
  trained over 25,000
  people. Curriculum
  is translated in
  15 languages, and
  MOVE exists in
  more than 20
  countries!

Question 4: Don't we have to break up primitive and abnormal reflexes before children can learn to move?

Don't we have to break up primitive and abnormal reflexes before children can learn to move?

Thee traditional approach to primitive and abnormal reflexes has come into question in several studies. Karl and Bertha Bobath (in Scrutton, 1984) no longer include tonic neck and tonic labyrinthine reflexes in their assessment of children. They found that they had grossly overrated those reflexes in explaining the abnormal patterns of the hypertonic child.

According to Bax, 1986, abnormal reflexes, primitive responses, and muscle tone are the result of the current cerebral pathology of the student. Any changes over time are probably due to a natural developmental process rather than to any mediation by a therapist or medication given to the student.

In other words, if a reflex can be "broken up," then it was a habitual movement pattern rather than a true reflex. If it cannot be "broken up," then the student needs to learn how to work and move without being a slave to the motor dysfunction. Regardless of the etiology of the movement patterns, the therapist can help a student perform functional activities such as eating, while learning appropriate movement patterns.


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